Fuck you, facebook!

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by halfwise on Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:16 pm

Don't have to delete it, just turn the crappy bits off.

_________________
Halfwise, son of Halfwit. Brother of Nitwit, son of Halfwit. Half brother of Figwit.
Then it gets complicated...
avatar
halfwise
Quintessence of Burrahobbitry

Posts : 14386
Join date : 2012-02-01
Location : rustic broom closet in farthing of Manhattan

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by bungobaggins on Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:06 pm

Ringdrotten wrote:
Norc wrote:i want to be able to delete my facebook, that freeing feeling you know, but the reality is i can't. i am a young person and my network and social life all evolves around facebook in one way or another. i would be totally alienated without it..

Word

It's really easy when you don't have a social life. hahahaha heh heh

{{{ Or did my social life disappear when I deleted my fakebook.  scratch Neutral }}}

bungobaggins
The Mayor

Posts : 6374
Join date : 2013-08-24

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by halfwise on Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:54 pm

Laughing

_________________
Halfwise, son of Halfwit. Brother of Nitwit, son of Halfwit. Half brother of Figwit.
Then it gets complicated...
avatar
halfwise
Quintessence of Burrahobbitry

Posts : 14386
Join date : 2012-02-01
Location : rustic broom closet in farthing of Manhattan

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Forest Shepherd on Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:02 am

I wonder about that as well actually.

_________________
Boar is badger, named after wood,
Not after forest but trees.
Where did you play on a rainy day?
Where did I eat bread and cheese?
Search inside, stay indoors,
Look up and find the secret is yours.
Your castle your fort,
Or so you thought.
The way is in four trees.
The way is in Boar in Brockhall
Under ale, under bread, under cheese.

-Mossflower, by Brian Jacques.
avatar
Forest Shepherd
Trekkie in training

Posts : 4081
Join date : 2013-11-02
Age : 27
Location : Northern California

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Bluebottle on Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:02 pm


_________________
“We're doomed,” he says, casually. “There's no question about that. But it's OK to be doomed because then you can just enjoy your life."
avatar
Bluebottle
Concerned citizen

Posts : 9842
Join date : 2013-11-09
Age : 31

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by halfwise on Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:20 pm

A week after the Berlin court ruled against Facebook, the social network promised to radically overhaul its privacy settings, saying the work would prepare it for the introduction in Europe of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a sweeping set of laws governing data use across the EU.

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, announced the changes, saying they would “put the core privacy settings for Facebook in one place and make it much easier for people to manage their data”.


Excellent. Nod

_________________
Halfwise, son of Halfwit. Brother of Nitwit, son of Halfwit. Half brother of Figwit.
Then it gets complicated...
avatar
halfwise
Quintessence of Burrahobbitry

Posts : 14386
Join date : 2012-02-01
Location : rustic broom closet in farthing of Manhattan

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Pettytyrant101 on Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:56 pm

{{ Yeah hats off to the EU on this one- they have been fighting for sweeping changes to online privacy with corporations for some time with GDPR.
Next up loot boxes -not only destroying gaming in general but an insidious way to get children gambling.}}}

_________________
Pure Publications, The Tower of Lore and the Former Admin's Office are Reasonably Proud to Present-



A Green And Pleasant Land

Compiled and annotated by Eldorion.


- get your copy here for a limited period- free*

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yjYiz8nuL3LqJ-yP9crpDKu_BH-1LwJU/view



*Pure Publications reserves the right to track your usage of this publication, snoop on your home address, go through your bins and sell personal information on to the highest bidder.
Warning may contain Wholesome Tales
avatar
Pettytyrant101
Crabbitmeister

Posts : 40692
Join date : 2011-02-14
Age : 46
Location : Scotshobbitland

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Bluebottle on Tue Feb 13, 2018 4:19 pm

Not sure it will function in the US though, as this is a EU intiative. :/

_________________
“We're doomed,” he says, casually. “There's no question about that. But it's OK to be doomed because then you can just enjoy your life."
avatar
Bluebottle
Concerned citizen

Posts : 9842
Join date : 2013-11-09
Age : 31

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by halfwise on Tue Feb 13, 2018 5:01 pm

But I think the design change for the interface will trickle across the pond, even if it doesn't have to.

_________________
Halfwise, son of Halfwit. Brother of Nitwit, son of Halfwit. Half brother of Figwit.
Then it gets complicated...
avatar
halfwise
Quintessence of Burrahobbitry

Posts : 14386
Join date : 2012-02-01
Location : rustic broom closet in farthing of Manhattan

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Bluebottle on Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:39 pm

Facebook has been ordered by a Belgian court to stop collecting data on users or face daily fines of €250,000 a day, or up to €100m.

The court ruled on Friday that Facebook had broken privacy laws by tracking people on third-party sites in the latest salvo in a long-running battle between the Belgian commission for the protection of privacy (CPP) and the social network.

“Facebook informs us insufficiently about gathering information about us, the kind of data it collects, what it does with that data and how long it stores it,” the court said. “It also does not gain our consent to collect and store all this information.”

Facebook has also been ordered to delete all data it had gathered illegally on Belgian citizens, including people who were not users of the social network.

The social media firm uses different methods to track the online behaviour of people if they are not on the company’s web site by placing cookies and invisible pixels on third party web sites, the court said.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/feb/16/facebook-ordered-stop-collecting-user-data-fines-belgian-court?

_________________
“We're doomed,” he says, casually. “There's no question about that. But it's OK to be doomed because then you can just enjoy your life."
avatar
Bluebottle
Concerned citizen

Posts : 9842
Join date : 2013-11-09
Age : 31

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by halfwise on Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:44 pm

Upon enrollment facebook should present its settings and preferences page as a step in the setup process. And when anything changes, they should be required to notify all users and provide a chance to opt out.

Of course, this would destroy their business model, which would destroy facebook. I wouldn't shed a tear.

_________________
Halfwise, son of Halfwit. Brother of Nitwit, son of Halfwit. Half brother of Figwit.
Then it gets complicated...
avatar
halfwise
Quintessence of Burrahobbitry

Posts : 14386
Join date : 2012-02-01
Location : rustic broom closet in farthing of Manhattan

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Bluebottle on Sat Feb 17, 2018 4:03 pm

Well, this is a major issue of data protection law. Consent legitimises the collection and use of personal data. But if consent is a prerequisite for use of a service, and most people simply click I agree to get access without reading the information, then how free and informed is that consent? This is one of the foremost question in the new EU data protection regulation.

https://united-kingdom.taylorwessing.com/globaldatahub/article-understanding-consent-under-the-gdpr.html

Since the Court of Justice of the European Union invalidated the Safe Harbour agreement which allowed Facebook and other internet companies to exchange personal data with their US counterparts on the assumption that the US offered a sufficient protection for that data, Facebook for a while largely been relying on the concept of consent for their collection and use of personal data. A new agreement was made in quick order to allow the same exchanges as the Safe Harbour agreement, called Privacy Shield. The CJEU is meant to look at that agreement too, in the not to distant future.

https://epic.org/privacy/intl/schrems/

_________________
“We're doomed,” he says, casually. “There's no question about that. But it's OK to be doomed because then you can just enjoy your life."
avatar
Bluebottle
Concerned citizen

Posts : 9842
Join date : 2013-11-09
Age : 31

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Forest Shepherd on Sat Feb 17, 2018 4:45 pm

Weird, personal data as commodity.

_________________
Boar is badger, named after wood,
Not after forest but trees.
Where did you play on a rainy day?
Where did I eat bread and cheese?
Search inside, stay indoors,
Look up and find the secret is yours.
Your castle your fort,
Or so you thought.
The way is in four trees.
The way is in Boar in Brockhall
Under ale, under bread, under cheese.

-Mossflower, by Brian Jacques.
avatar
Forest Shepherd
Trekkie in training

Posts : 4081
Join date : 2013-11-02
Age : 27
Location : Northern California

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Bluebottle on Sat Feb 17, 2018 4:48 pm

Legal specification.

Facebook relies on different bases for (1) processing personal data, and (2) transfering that data to the US, a third country in the sense of the Data Protection Directive. (DPD)

The processing of personal data is defined as follows:

'processing of personal data' ('processing') shall mean any operation or set of operations which is performed upon personal data, whether or not by automatic means, such as collection, recording, organization, storage, adaptation or alteration, retrieval, consultation, use, disclosure by transmission, dissemination or otherwise making available, alignment or combination, blocking, erasure or destruction; (DPD art. 2 b)

Art. 7 of the DPD outlnes the current legitimate bases for processing personal data.


SECTION II

CRITERIA FOR MAKING DATA PROCESSING LEGITIMATE

Article 7

Member States shall provide that personal data may be processed only if:

(a) the data subject has unambiguously given his consent; or

(b) processing is necessary for the performance of a contract to which the data subject is party or in order to take steps at the request of the data subject prior to entering into a contract; or

(c) processing is necessary for compliance with a legal obligation to which the controller is subject; or

(d) processing is necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject; or

(e) processing is necessary for the performance of a task carried out in the public interest or in the exercise of official authority vested in the controller or in a third party to whom the data are disclosed; or

(f) processing is necessary for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by the controller or by the third party or parties to whom the data are disclosed, except where such interests are overridden by the interests for fundamental rights and freedoms of the data subject which require protection under Article 1 (1).

Consent:

'the data subject's consent' shall mean any freely given specific and informed indication of his wishes by which the data subject signifies his agreement to personal data relating to him being processed. (Art. 2 h)

Art. 25 states that there shall be no transfer of data unless an adequate level of protection is assured in the third country:

Article 25

Principles

1. The Member States shall provide that the transfer to a third country of personal data which are undergoing processing or are intended for processing after transfer may take place only if, without prejudice to compliance with the national provisions adopted pursuant to the other provisions of this Directive, the third country in question ensures an adequate level of protection.

2. The adequacy of the level of protection afforded by a third country shall be assessed in the light of all the circumstances surrounding a data transfer operation or set of data transfer operations; particular consideration shall be given to the nature of the data, the purpose and duration of the proposed processing operation or operations, the country of origin and country of final destination, the rules of law, both general and sectoral, in force in the third country in question and the professional rules and security measures which are complied with in that country.

3. The Member States and the Commission shall inform each other of cases where they consider that a third country does not ensure an adequate level of protection within the meaning of paragraph 2.

4. Where the Commission finds, under the procedure provided for in Article 31 (2), that a third country does not ensure an adequate level of protection within the meaning of paragraph 2 of this Article, Member States shall take the measures necessary to prevent any transfer of data of the same type to the third country in question.

5. At the appropriate time, the Commission shall enter into negotiations with a view to remedying the situation resulting from the finding made pursuant to paragraph 4.

6. The Commission may find, in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 31 (2), that a third country ensures an adequate level of protection within the meaning of paragraph 2 of this Article, by reason of its domestic law or of the international commitments it has entered into, particularly upon conclusion of the negotiations referred to in paragraph 5, for the protection of the private lives and basic freedoms and rights of individuals.

Member States shall take the measures necessary to comply with the Commission's decision.

Derogations from the principle in art. 25 (transfer only allowed if adequate level of protection.)

Article 26

Derogations

1. By way of derogation from Article 25 and save where otherwise provided by domestic law governing particular cases, Member States shall provide that a transfer or a set of transfers of personal data to a third country which does not ensure an adequate level of protection within the meaning of Article 25 (2) may take place on condition that:

(a) the data subject has given his consent unambiguously to the proposed transfer; or

(b) the transfer is necessary for the performance of a contract between the data subject and the controller or the implementation of precontractual measures taken in response to the data subject's request; or

(c) the transfer is necessary for the conclusion or performance of a contract concluded in the interest of the data subject between the controller and a third party; or

(d) the transfer is necessary or legally required on important public interest grounds, or for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims; or

(e) the transfer is necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject; or

(f) the transfer is made from a register which according to laws or regulations is intended to provide information to the public and which is open to consultation either by the public in general or by any person who can demonstrate legitimate interest, to the extent that the conditions laid down in law for consultation are fulfilled in the particular case.

2. Without prejudice to paragraph 1, a Member State may authorize a transfer or a set of transfers of personal data to a third country which does not ensure an adequate level of protection within the meaning of Article 25 (2), where the controller adduces adequate safeguards with respect to the protection of the privacy and fundamental rights and freedoms of individuals and as regards the exercise of the corresponding rights; such safeguards may in particular result from appropriate contractual clauses.

3. The Member State shall inform the Commission and the other Member States of the authorizations it grants pursuant to paragraph 2.

If a Member State or the Commission objects on justified grounds involving the protection of the privacy and fundamental rights and freedoms of individuals, the Commission shall take appropriate measures in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 31 (2).

Member States shall take the necessary measures to comply with the Commission's decision.

4. Where the Commission decides, in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 31 (2), that certain standard contractual clauses offer sufficient safeguards as required by paragraph 2, Member States shall take the necessary measures to comply with the Commission's decision.

Art. 31 (2) on this process:

CHAPTER VII COMMUNITY IMPLEMENTING MEASURES

Article 31

The Committee

1. The Commission shall be assisted by a committee composed of the representatives of the Member States and chaired by the representative of the Commission.

2. The representative of the Commission shall submit to the committee a draft of the measures to be taken. The committee shall deliver its opinion on the draft within a time limit which the chairman may lay down according to the urgency of the matter.

The opinion shall be delivered by the majority laid down in Article 148 (2) of the Treaty. The votes of the representatives of the Member States within the committee shall be weighted in the manner set out in that Article. The chairman shall not vote.

The Commission shall adopt measures which shall apply immediately. However, if these measures are not in accordance with the opinion of the committee, they shall be communicated by the Commission to the Council forthwith. It that event:

- the Commission shall defer application of the measures which it has decided for a period of three months from the date of communication,

- the Council, acting by a qualified majority, may take a different decision within the time limit referred to in the first indent.


Last edited by Bluebottle on Sat Feb 17, 2018 5:07 pm; edited 1 time in total

_________________
“We're doomed,” he says, casually. “There's no question about that. But it's OK to be doomed because then you can just enjoy your life."
avatar
Bluebottle
Concerned citizen

Posts : 9842
Join date : 2013-11-09
Age : 31

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Bluebottle on Sat Feb 17, 2018 4:53 pm

Forest Shepherd wrote:Weird, personal data as commodity.

It is their bread and butter Nod

Advertising revenue is Facebook's biggest source of income, jumping 45% this year, with mobile ad sales accounting for 78% of that.

Being able to track web-browsing habits, even anonymised ones, allows it to better target that advertising.

The internet has always been offered for free and, the argument goes, people would not be prepared to pay cold, hard cash for services from the likes of Facebook and Google, preferring instead to pay with their data.

Facebook has learnt from past mistakes that it has to treat user data with kid gloves, understanding that privacy is hugely important to its members.

It allows users to opt out of having ads targeted at them by going to Settings, Adverts and then Advert Preferences but, pointed out Mr Van Alsenoy, this does not stop Facebook collecting the information.

Cookies which track browsing habits have always been controversial and, in 2011, all EU websites were forced to get consent from visitors to store or retrieve any information on a computer, smartphone or tablet.
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34776191

_________________
“We're doomed,” he says, casually. “There's no question about that. But it's OK to be doomed because then you can just enjoy your life."
avatar
Bluebottle
Concerned citizen

Posts : 9842
Join date : 2013-11-09
Age : 31

Back to top Go down

Re: Fuck you, facebook!

Post by Bluebottle on Sat Feb 17, 2018 5:08 pm

Bluebottle wrote:Legal specification.

Facebook relies on different bases for (1) processing personal data, and (2) transfering that data to the US, a third country in the sense of the Data Protection Directive. (DPD)

The processing of personal data is defined as follows:

'processing of personal data' ('processing') shall mean any operation or set of operations which is performed upon personal data, whether or not by automatic means, such as collection, recording, organization, storage, adaptation or alteration, retrieval, consultation, use, disclosure by transmission, dissemination or otherwise making available, alignment or combination, blocking, erasure or destruction; (DPD art. 2 b)

Art. 7 of the DPD outlnes the current legitimate bases for processing personal data.


SECTION II

CRITERIA FOR MAKING DATA PROCESSING LEGITIMATE

Article 7

Member States shall provide that personal data may be processed only if:

(a) the data subject has unambiguously given his consent; or

(b) processing is necessary for the performance of a contract to which the data subject is party or in order to take steps at the request of the data subject prior to entering into a contract; or

(c) processing is necessary for compliance with a legal obligation to which the controller is subject; or

(d) processing is necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject; or

(e) processing is necessary for the performance of a task carried out in the public interest or in the exercise of official authority vested in the controller or in a third party to whom the data are disclosed; or

(f) processing is necessary for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by the controller or by the third party or parties to whom the data are disclosed, except where such interests are overridden by the interests for fundamental rights and freedoms of the data subject which require protection under Article 1 (1).

Consent:

'the data subject's consent' shall mean any freely given specific and informed indication of his wishes by which the data subject signifies his agreement to personal data relating to him being processed. (Art. 2 h)

Art. 25 states that there shall be no transfer of data unless an adequate level of protection is assured in the third country:

Article 25

Principles

1. The Member States shall provide that the transfer to a third country of personal data which are undergoing processing or are intended for processing after transfer may take place only if, without prejudice to compliance with the national provisions adopted pursuant to the other provisions of this Directive, the third country in question ensures an adequate level of protection.

2. The adequacy of the level of protection afforded by a third country shall be assessed in the light of all the circumstances surrounding a data transfer operation or set of data transfer operations; particular consideration shall be given to the nature of the data, the purpose and duration of the proposed processing operation or operations, the country of origin and country of final destination, the rules of law, both general and sectoral, in force in the third country in question and the professional rules and security measures which are complied with in that country.

3. The Member States and the Commission shall inform each other of cases where they consider that a third country does not ensure an adequate level of protection within the meaning of paragraph 2.

4. Where the Commission finds, under the procedure provided for in Article 31 (2), that a third country does not ensure an adequate level of protection within the meaning of paragraph 2 of this Article, Member States shall take the measures necessary to prevent any transfer of data of the same type to the third country in question.

5. At the appropriate time, the Commission shall enter into negotiations with a view to remedying the situation resulting from the finding made pursuant to paragraph 4.

6. The Commission may find, in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 31 (2), that a third country ensures an adequate level of protection within the meaning of paragraph 2 of this Article, by reason of its domestic law or of the international commitments it has entered into, particularly upon conclusion of the negotiations referred to in paragraph 5, for the protection of the private lives and basic freedoms and rights of individuals.

Member States shall take the measures necessary to comply with the Commission's decision.

Derogations from the principle in art. 25 (transfer only allowed if adequate level of protection.)

Article 26

Derogations

1. By way of derogation from Article 25 and save where otherwise provided by domestic law governing particular cases, Member States shall provide that a transfer or a set of transfers of personal data to a third country which does not ensure an adequate level of protection within the meaning of Article 25 (2) may take place on condition that:

(a) the data subject has given his consent unambiguously to the proposed transfer; or

(b) the transfer is necessary for the performance of a contract between the data subject and the controller or the implementation of precontractual measures taken in response to the data subject's request; or

(c) the transfer is necessary for the conclusion or performance of a contract concluded in the interest of the data subject between the controller and a third party; or

(d) the transfer is necessary or legally required on important public interest grounds, or for the establishment, exercise or defence of legal claims; or

(e) the transfer is necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject; or

(f) the transfer is made from a register which according to laws or regulations is intended to provide information to the public and which is open to consultation either by the public in general or by any person who can demonstrate legitimate interest, to the extent that the conditions laid down in law for consultation are fulfilled in the particular case.

2. Without prejudice to paragraph 1, a Member State may authorize a transfer or a set of transfers of personal data to a third country which does not ensure an adequate level of protection within the meaning of Article 25 (2), where the controller adduces adequate safeguards with respect to the protection of the privacy and fundamental rights and freedoms of individuals and as regards the exercise of the corresponding rights; such safeguards may in particular result from appropriate contractual clauses.

3. The Member State shall inform the Commission and the other Member States of the authorizations it grants pursuant to paragraph 2.

If a Member State or the Commission objects on justified grounds involving the protection of the privacy and fundamental rights and freedoms of individuals, the Commission shall take appropriate measures in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 31 (2).

Member States shall take the necessary measures to comply with the Commission's decision.

4. Where the Commission decides, in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 31 (2), that certain standard contractual clauses offer sufficient safeguards as required by paragraph 2, Member States shall take the necessary measures to comply with the Commission's decision.

Art. 31 (2) on this process:

CHAPTER VII COMMUNITY IMPLEMENTING MEASURES

Article 31

The Committee

1. The Commission shall be assisted by a committee composed of the representatives of the Member States and chaired by the representative of the Commission.

2. The representative of the Commission shall submit to the committee a draft of the measures to be taken. The committee shall deliver its opinion on the draft within a time limit which the chairman may lay down according to the urgency of the matter.

The opinion shall be delivered by the majority laid down in Article 148 (2) of the Treaty. The votes of the representatives of the Member States within the committee shall be weighted in the manner set out in that Article. The chairman shall not vote.

The Commission shall adopt measures which shall apply immediately. However, if these measures are not in accordance with the opinion of the committee, they shall be communicated by the Commission to the Council forthwith. It that event:

- the Commission shall defer application of the measures which it has decided for a period of three months from the date of communication,

- the Council, acting by a qualified majority, may take a different decision within the time limit referred to in the first indent.


The story goes a bit as follows, The European Commission (EU) had made a decision that the level of protection of personal data in the US was adequate, (the Safe Harbour agreement, art. 25 (6)) then the Snowden-case happened. Suddenly it was clear that all data going in and out of the US was registered by the NSA and others. And there were distinct issues with the assurances that the American companies actually were held to a European standard in their processing of the personal data.

Maximillian Schrems an Austrian law student opened a case against Belgium in ireland, its European headquarters, eventually an Irish court sent this case to the Court of Justice of the European Union, for a preliminary ruling. (A normative clarification on the legal issue in the sense of EU law.) The CJEU invalidated the Safe Harbour agreement, as it was not clear that the level of protection was kept at European level by the companies, and

For a short time, Facebook had to rely on consent as a basis for the data transfers. (art. 26 (1) a) A new agreement was drawned up by the European Commission in short order. (The Privacy Shield agreement) That agreement has also been been subject to a complaint for Irish courts and referred to the ECHR, and is awaiting treatment by the court.

While this is happening the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into force in May and subplant the Data Protection Directive. It has set a stricter criteria as far as prtection, and in particular consent, is concerned.

_________________
“We're doomed,” he says, casually. “There's no question about that. But it's OK to be doomed because then you can just enjoy your life."
avatar
Bluebottle
Concerned citizen

Posts : 9842
Join date : 2013-11-09
Age : 31

Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum